Talk Like a Mainah

If you’re an “outta-statah” (aka, not from here) considering a move to Dirigo Pines, there are a few terms with which you should familiarize yourself. Dirigo Pines Resident Services Director Juanita Taylor recently shared some “Words My Dad Used” in the September issue of Inn the Pines, the Dirigo activities newsletter, which can be found here. It’s a wicked good way to keep up-to-date on all the Dirigo happenings.

Words My Dad Used

AYUH: An affirmative response. Conversationally equivalent to yep.

BEETAH: “Beater” – an old, rusty piece of crap car, usually a pickup truck that’s not really good for anything other than hauling wood.

BLINKAH: “Blinker” – if you drive in Maine in the summer, you better know this one

CHOUT: As in “watch out” – one might warn you, “Chout for them dee-ah at dusk on Route 1.”

CUNNIN’: Cute. Sometimes used to describe little children. Often used for small, fluffy baby animals. “Look at that bunny, ain’t he cunnin’.”

DEEAH: “Dear” – a term of endearment widely used by everyone from wait staff to your great Aunt Millie.

DITE: As in, “just a dite” – meaning just a little.

DOOR YAHD: The yard around your house – front yard, back yard – all of it.

GAWMY: Clumsy, klutzy, prone to doing stupid things.

KIFE: To steal something.

NUMB: Dumb or dense.

OUT IN THE WILLIE-WACKS: Out in the middle of nowhere (also willy wags).

PEEKED: Pronounced PEEK-ED to describe someone as pale and not feeling well.

PUCKAHBRUSH: The puckerbrush – lots of tree branches, dead leaves and grass – on the side of the road.

RIGHT OUT STRAIGHT: Really, really busy.

SPLEENY: Wimpy!

SWIG: To drink something. You might ask “hey, can I have a swig of that?”

 

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